Baltimore Arabbers: Preserving tradition. Feeding communities.

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 23: BALTIMORE ARABBERS - PRESERVING TRADITION, FEEDING COMMUNITIES

A FEW QUOTES

  • Juneteenth - an American holiday that commemorates the June 19, 1865, announcement of the abolition of slavery in the U.S. state of Texas, and more generally the emancipation of enslaved African-Americans throughout the former Confederacy of the southern United States.

  • We recognize Arabbing as an African-American folk tradition; an economically-viable system and method of apprenticeship unique to Baltimore.

  • Arabbing is a long-standing, locally-specific African American tradition out of Baltimore. An Arabber is a street vendor selling fruits and vegetables from a colorful, horse-drawn cart. Once a common sight in American East Coast cities, only a handful of Arabbers still walk the streets of Baltimore. On this episode, we sit down with James Chase, President of the Arabbers Preservation Society and an Arabber himself; and Holden Warren, filmmaker and producer of John & James - a documentary short about James’ work and his relationship with the Amish.

  • Best part of being an Arabber is being your own boss.

  • If you have a load of watermelons you may want to go North, if you have a load of tomatoes you may go South - it depends on the season, what you have on your cart.

  • It makes me feel wonderful that people are depending on me. For us to provide the elderly with fresh fruits and vegetables, even if they don't have money - we extend a line of credit. We are going to get older too, who's going to take care of us? [...] I love going there to serve these people [...] it's a hard world out there. 

  • People may think its outdated, but when kids come into The Yard and see the horses, and you see their faces...

  • We want to create a horse discovery center, as therapy animals. It is a place with a lot of violence [...] violence is segregated to very specific neighborhoods and the Arabbers are very much ensconced in the middle of the violence. 

  • James' work is very important because of the fruit, because of entrepreneurship but also to create a place of healing [...] a de facto therapy center. 

  • I had all of the opportunities to be a part of the drug circles, but because of the older generation taking me in and teaching me [...] the youth aren't getting the same love and attention. 

  • All that stuff on social media ain't nothing but illusions. 

  • People don't realize this connection exists between the Arabbers and the Amish/Mennonite communities [in New Holland PA].

  • The only people who work their horses like the Arabbers do are the Amish. They're using them in the same capacity - there's this really intrinsic bond. 

  • Given the racial politics of this country right now, [as a black and white guy] they're able to have [honest] conversations and respect each other on such a deep level. [...] [This film] is about humanity and this deeper connection. 

  • Don't be a pretender, just be yourself. You just have to be yourself.

  • As long as you have respect for yourself, and respect for others - you can do anything you want. The sky's the limit. Me, I'm just a people's person. It comes from me being exposed to different things in life. I've seen a lot of things. 

  • Don't sit out here on these streets wasting your time. Trouble is easy to get into, and hard to get out of. Just look around, it's all in your face of what you could become. 

  • If you ever want to come to Baltimore and see the Arabber yard, come check us out! 

  • Support by donating, spread the word, buy some fruit.

  • To Juneteenth: Baltimore as a free city - one of the first entrepreneurial things the Black community could do is Arabbing. It is the beginning of Black entrepreneurship. 

  • The American dream: you don't have anyone above you. People came here to become a self-made man. It wasn't about becoming rich, it was about being your own dude. [...] It's about freedom and perserverance. Having agency and ownership of your action and living out your true purpose. 
     

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I AM WANDA: A New Generation of Food Sheros

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 22: A NEW GENERATION OF FOOD SHEROS

A FEW QUOTES

  • Tambra Raye Stevenson is the founder and CEO of WANDA: Women Advancing Nutrition, Dietetics, and Agriculture, an organization inspiring a new generation of women and girls to become ‘food sheroes’ in Africa and Diaspora.

  • "Globally the state of opportunities for women and girls of African descent in agriculture and nutrition is dismal at best — as a consumer and change-maker. WANDA works to change the next chapter of this story through our innovative educational programs, advocacy and policy and much-needed promotion for women and girls making an impact from farm to fork."

  • We wanted to see imagery and narrative that is not on the forefront to motivate women and girls - to see themselves in dynamic ways, in which they can be and historically have been. Putting them in positions of power. 

  • That food shero story, for me, is multiple layers. My daughter Ruby had a cavity at age 4 [...] the teacher using junk food as rewards. 

  • You don't have to wait to create the change that you want to see. How can a 5 year old advocate and create the change?

  • We know the big companies see youth as a prime market, as brand ambassadors. 

  • Your micro-actions matter - down to rewarding someone with Swedish Fish (or whatever candy) instead of another, more healthy product.

  • How do we create imagery like the Beyoncé of nutrition? What about for Blue Ivy's generation? That is Little Wanda.

  • The local food economies [in Africa] already put women in positions of power. 

  • You are a creator. You are a producer. But with the community, with the resources, that can change. [...] We don't need more diabetic dessert companies, but we do need healthier snacks and food options.

  • There's something within us that keeps biting at us until we complete it - and that is our soul completion project. It really is a culmination of the spirits aligning. 

  • Using edutainment to create a powerful message [...] our audience, 5 year olds and up, there's a focus on literacy and how can parents, teachers use our products to teach young girls to be food sheros.

  • BFF - Best Foodie Friends

  • For millet to grow in northern Nigeria, it is very arid - desert-like. It takes a strong millet to grow there - it is a strong food, for a strong people. Eating it, it is in your DNA.

  • Food is a great way to bridge cross-cultural communications - we need more global citizens.

  • WANDA was an extension of NativSol Kitchen - to have women and girls realize they're a part of a bigger movement. WANDA is a network to bring us together, but to bring girls to the table and learn how to create and sell their products. Perhaps they're creating products around the characters that we have. 

  • Kid entrepreneurs - giving them a platform and space for them to use the framework/mission of WANDA.
     

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Building Your Brand Narrative - from Social Media to TED Talk

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 21: BUILDING YOUR BRAND NARRATIVE

A FEW QUOTES

  • TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking one of the main pieces of advice from Chris Anderson, the head Curator of TED, reads: "Make your idea worth sharing. By that I mean, ask yourself the question: "Who does this idea benefit?" And I need you to be honest with the answer. If the idea only serves you or your organization, then, I'm sorry to say, it's probably not worth sharing."

  • One of the things we struggled with when we hit the ground was access to information. This is something Puerto Ricans experienced trying to reach family members. No one knew what was happening on the Island. Almost accidentally, but as a pat of the DNA of José and who I am, we wanted to share in real time what was going on and feel a part of the response. 

  • It [social media] was not polished, but it was real.

  • We had dispatches of what was happening each day and it created a movement. Storytelling creates the opportunity to have people engaged, even if they couldn't be there in person.

  • Dine n' Dash takes over 35 restaurants in the District (Penn Quarter & 14th St). We're launching a pop-up restaurant this year "Puerto Rico House" - featuring the food, culture, music, drink of Puerto Rico and our #ChefsforPuertoRico

  • The food trucks were our delivery angels in Puerto Rico.

  • We're often thinking: how do I get what I have into someone else's brain. It tends to be focused on yourself. This is normal. [...] But you have to put yourself in someone else's shoes. Who is your audience and what are the things that they want to know about? What's the way they want to learn? 

  • Three tips for delivering a compelling narrative: (1) have a specific focus; (2) what is the headline that is going to capture people's attention; (3) practice, practice, practice.
     

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How to Become a B Corp and Measure Your Impact

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 20: HOW TO BECOME A B CORP AND MEASURE YOUR IMPACT

A FEW QUOTES

  • At Cureate, we’re on a mission to shift purchasing dollars back into local economies; while strengthening our small business community through access to education and resources. That first function: shifting purchasing dollars. How do we do that? Well we have a procurement platform where Buyers issue RFPs (request for proposals) to small business owners to bid. We’ve created a competitive, transparent local marketplace for big and small to do business with one another. We’re also able to see the trends in supply and demand - what types of products are small businesses producing vs. the ASK of the Buyer - and how much alignment is there really. This is a very unique position to be in.

  • B Lab is a nonprofit based near Philadelphia - who issues the B Corp Certification.

  • Employees, Suppliers, Environment, Community, etc. are all considered for B Corp Certification.

  • 2500 B Corps Certified in the United States, and B Corps are located in 150 different countries - 12% of companies are food & agriculture based companies.

  • 200 question survey focused on governance, community, workers, customers, and the environment.

  • Why should food companies consider becoming B Corp?

  • When you look at what food & agriculture is, what you're putting into your body, you want to have food that is sourced locally, organically - shipping grapes in from Chile is not environmentally friendly. [...] A lot of aspects of food, you can see that it's all interconnected.

  • 68 cents of every dollar goes back into the local economy when you buy from a small business

  • When we talk about building food businesses, we may talk about different aspects of business in silos - food safety links to sourcing links to your mission. It's all interconnected.

  • Certification fees range from $500-$50,000 depending on your revenues.

  • B Impact Assessment: https://bimpactassessment.net/
     

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A Minisode: Are Pop-Ups Worth It?

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

On this Minisode: what are parts of the process to consider when deciding if a "pop-up" concept is worth it for your business?

EPISODE 19: ARE POP-UPS WORTH IT?

 

A few show notes

  • Are Pop-Ups Worth It blog post with a FLOW CHART

  • First: You need to determine your objective. Oftentimes when I am setting a goal, I need to envision -- what does a successful outcome look like. This helps in framing what it is I am ultimately going to achieve.

  • #PROTIP: In order to avoid a sticky situation, make sure all stakeholders involved are on the same page. Don’t be afraid to write a MOU - memorandum of understanding - for all parties to sign. You need to make sure your IP - intellectual property - is covered AND that you are paid for your labor/ingredients/products if you are no the one collecting the money on-site.

  • Second: Who is your target audience? Have you thought about who your early adopter is of your product? Do they work around or live near the location where you are popping-up? If not, how will they get there? When thinking about your early adopter, I also often call this a Buyer Persona or Buyer Profile. Who is this person? 

  • Third: Have you thought through the user experience? I don’t mean just menu concept and purchasing ingredients either. What is the ambiance? When people arrive, are they greeted with a certain product, a smile, a secret clue? What is the entire user experience of the operation. 

  • The last and very important piece is - what is your call-to-action? What do you want people to do once they’ve had this experience? Do you want them to sign-up for a listserv to stay up to date with future events? Do you want them to tag photos with a particular hashtag? Do you have a secret code to give out to guests to provide to their friends so the word-of-mouth keeps spreading? Make this call-to-action UNIQUE to your experience.

  • So to recap: Define your objective, Identify your target audience, Think through the user experience, and Develop a call-to-action
     

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On Management and Workforce Development: Humanim's Culinary Social Enterprises

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 18: ON MANAGEMENT AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT - HUMANIM'S CULINARY ENTERPRISES

A FEW QUOTES

  • "I've interviewed hundreds of entrepreneurial parents and there's one consistent theme I keep hearing: how much the jump off the deep dive into parenting readied them for business challenges in a way they didn't first expect. In fact, of the many skills they gain are completely in line with what entrepreneurship asks of us.” — Sarah K. Peck 

  • If you start to miss deadlines, you start losing money. At City Seeds and School of Food, I've learned how to blend thoughtfulness with deadlines. 

  • China, from ACT, told me: everyday start with 3 things you must accomplish and whatever happens throughout your day - those are the 3 things you have to do. 

  • Best practices for creating management systems: (1) USE SLACK! (2) Be an opposite of a micro-manager (3) I encourage failure - if we don't take calculated risks, we won't know!

  • A question I often ask my operations manager, Mel Foldes, is "what do you think?" I quickly turn it around and get her suggestion first. I don't want to provide my input first, [as opposed to] ... developing that critical thinking. 

  • Scenarios help describe what I'd like to see in a particular outcome. I describe what the goal is, as opposed to saying what they need to do in order to achieve that goal. 

  • Job Training Scorecard is a deeper-dive on how we look at the progress of our team. 

  • Having this scorecard puts a metric on our impact and also allows us to be reflective on how far we've come. 

  • We're offering culinary classes in partnership with entrepreneurs like Taharka Brothers.

  • How being a parent helps in running a business. How? (1) keeps me focused; I always make sure there is an agenda at every meeting (2) staying flexible and evolving (3) slowing down.
     

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Positive Force for Change: Best Practices in Co-Creative Innovation

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 17: positive force for change: best practices for co-creative innovation

A FEW QUOTES

  • From my understanding: there’s an old power model that is like a castle — at least that is how it is coined in Henry and Jeremy’s book. Castle’s are like government organizations, or even Apple. Oftentimes acting in secrecy and then deploying a new regulation or new product and say - that is that! Deal with the outcome. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the new power model looks like Kickstarter or Etsy - where the power of the crowd is what makes the entity strong (not the consolidation of power).

  • This is an ancient, and fundamental power. When I try to understand something, I look to nature [...] nature distributes power and creates resiliency.

  • Systems are not supposed to be arbitrarily consistent. You are supposed to ebb-and-flow and have many feedback loops - both positive and negative.

  • We actively work to mitigate feedback and participation - these "negative" feedback loops.

  • People say, "growth at all costs!" but it's optimizing for just one variable — wealth.

  • Biomimicry is an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable solutions to human challenges by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies.

  • A Recollective Way: (1) Sharing Power; (2) Prioritize Relationships; (3) Leverage Heterogeneity; (4) Legitimize All Ways of Knowing; (5) Prototype Early and Often

  • When this country first started, there weren't for-profits and non-profits — there were mutual benefit corporations

  • Act with reciprocity in all aspects of your business. 
     

RESOURCES

Some of the ideas Jess shared on the show were inspired and informed by the work of the following thought leaders, among many others:

Jess' work is available at:

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What Does Improv Have to do with Farmers Markets?

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 16: WHAT DOES IMPROV HAVE TO DO WITH FARMERS MARKETS?

a few QUOTES

  • Ultimately… isn’t business about solving someone’s problem with your solution, and then having them pay you for your solution? This month Cureate collaborated with the University of the District of Columbia on workshops around Market Readiness - how to get yourself prepared and on top of your game for farmers market season. We began our discussion around this fundamental point: business is about solving problems AND why are you the best or most unique solution to solve your customers problem - so that they give you money.

  • "So many people enter entrepreneurship because, in their words, they want to be their own boss. While this makes for a good motto, it's not an accurate picture of the dynamics at play when you're running your own business. Large or small, your company only succeeds by meeting a need in the market. As those needs shift, your company needs to shift as well. It's not a nice ability to have -- it's a necessity."

  • I get to work with partners across the city to look at what sustainability innovation and urban resilience could be - with a focus on social entrepreneurship.

  • Working hands on in the community and building urban resiliency through entrepreneurship.

  • UDC has aquaponic/hydroponic systems at each of our campuses across the city.

  • May Day is my favorite day of the year because we're recognizing and honoring our labor and the incredibleness of Springtime - especially in DC!

  • "Nature's First Green is Gold..."

  • The Spring is such a metaphor for everything but certainly life in the sense that so much of what we think is dead returns in the Spring, and when we hit really low points in our lives the memory that Spring can come - that we have really beautiful points of growth that follows the darkness.

  • If you can save an entrepreneur from one big mistake - that can be the difference between success and failure for small businesses.

  • Entrepreneurial resilience is so necessary in today's workforce.

  • Farmers are always entrepreneurs [...] and when trees start flowering in the middle of February and then it starts snowing, you have to adapt and adjust! We really don't control nature.

  • Three tips for farmers/food entrepreneurs who want to maximize their potential at Farmers Markets this season:

    • Strong visual identity - your merchandising, your personality - at your table

    • Engaging - you, your eyes, your smile or conversation will bring people over

    • Be Observant, and ASK what brings people to the market

  • Improv is about taking whatever our scene partner throws at us and adapting to that new reality.

  • In every customer interaction, a customer has something totally separate going on, different desires, and can we adapt to meet the needs of that scene?

  • Structure allows you to play within it.

  • Improv is all about listening and watching your scene partner - same with customer service!
     

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A Minisode: How to Register a LLC

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

On this Minisode: what are parts of the process to consider when registering a LLC (Limited Liability Company) in Washington DC.

EPISODE 15: HOW TO REGISTER A LLC

RESOURCES

  • Help Starting a Small Business in DC” - Prince of Petworth

  • "Is an LLC the Best Fit For Your Small Business?" - Charles Myrick CPA

  • Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) 

    • Protip #1: do thorough research on your business name. Is there potential that you are infringing on someone else’s trademark? Does someone already own the URL that you want? Have the social media handles you need? Do your research. 

  • corponline.dcra.dc.gov — Register, and scroll down to Domestic, Limited Liability Corporation. Fill out the necessary information. 

  • Go back to OTR and register on DC’s Tax Portal: MyTax.DC.gov

    • Protip #2: get an accountant that not only can help you during tax season, but also will create a financial forecast with you to make estimated quarterly payments. No one is paying into the system on your behalf anymore. You will make quarterly payments to both Federal (the IRS) and DC. 

  • In the District, you also need a Basic Business License. A Basic Business License is a document issued from the DCRA's Business Licensing Division and is required for such business activities as the operation of restaurants, convenience/retail stores, consulting firms, home improvement businesses, and many more.

  • You’ll need to fill out the Basic Business License forms found at business.dc.gov, and have your business and tax registration handy. Additionally, you’ll need to have the certificate of occupancy for your location OR if you work from home, you need to apply for a Home Occupancy Permit

    • Protip #3: These licenses will run ~$500 so be prepared for that upfront expense! 

  • There are other aspects to this process to consider based on the type of business you are opening, but these are high-level steps you will need to work through.

    • The Department of Small and Local Business Development (DSLBD) has enlisted our team at Cureate to create an online portal with features to help address your business’ needs.

      DSLBD is committed to helping local businesses operate and grow in the District of Columbia — whether it’s through marketing your business, creating connections with your peers, or obtaining financing to grow. 

      We would love your feedback to help us find ways to demystify regulatory processes and minimize challenges for DC businesses and entrepreneurs. If you have a moment, please take a brief survey we’ve put together to let us know what you need as a business and how DC Government can better serve you — http://bit.ly/ToolkitBiz
       

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This Entrepreneur Wins $1,000 from Community-Based Business

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 
 

EPISODE 14: THIS ENTREPRENEUR WINS $1,000 FROM COMMUNITY-BASED BUSINESS


A FEW QUOTES:

  • Do you have a challenge you've been facing at your business? We're starting minisodes on The Tidbit on the How-To's of growing and scaling your operations. Want to ask your questions to be answered on air? Sign-up for our newsletter! Links below.
  • Everyone is entitled to an exceptional living experience.
  • [Nest] creates a highly customer service oriented approach to property management.
  • When you have great spaces, you attract great tenants. And when you're happy at home, you are a better neighbor. And better neighbors are active in their communities, which is better for the city.
  • We measured our success based on the number of good jobs we were creating. 
  • Are you hiring a team member and putting them into a system that is streamlined?
  • The more streamlined we are from a systems-based perspective, our team can be there when there is an emergency or when there's an opportunity to problem solve. 
  • There was no way for me to enjoy success as an entrepreneur without having a really great team of talent. 
  • I wanted to create an opportunity for others to have the agency/ownership, [...] and buy into a new concept that was separate from but synergistic with Nest DC. 
  • We now have 15 owners of Roost DC! Hands-down this is one of my proudest moments as a business owner. 
  • Our ability to meaningfully to the community is core to our business from the beginning. Time and talent has always been available, but now we are financially giving back.
  • We're really excited to be offering $1,000 to... SOILFUL CITY!
  • Thanks for the work that you do - if there is anything we can do to help with exposure, we want to make sure you thrive and succeed! 
  • Hear Xavier's full reaction at 21:15 and how he intends to use the funds.
  • Listen to Xavier's full story on his Tidbit episode
     

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