How to Register a LLC

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

On this Minisode: what are parts of the process to consider when registering a LLC (Limited Liability Company) in Washington DC.

EPISODE 15: HOW TO REGISTER A LLC

RESOURCES

  • Help Starting a Small Business in DC” - Prince of Petworth

  • "Is an LLC the Best Fit For Your Small Business?" - Charles Myrick CPA

  • Employer Identification Number (EIN) from the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) 

    • Protip #1: do thorough research on your business name. Is there potential that you are infringing on someone else’s trademark? Does someone already own the URL that you want? Have the social media handles you need? Do your research. 

  • corponline.dcra.dc.gov — Register, and scroll down to Domestic, Limited Liability Corporation. Fill out the necessary information. 

  • Go back to OTR and register on DC’s Tax Portal: MyTax.DC.gov

    • Protip #2: get an accountant that not only can help you during tax season, but also will create a financial forecast with you to make estimated quarterly payments. No one is paying into the system on your behalf anymore. You will make quarterly payments to both Federal (the IRS) and DC. 

  • In the District, you also need a Basic Business License. A Basic Business License is a document issued from the DCRA's Business Licensing Division and is required for such business activities as the operation of restaurants, convenience/retail stores, consulting firms, home improvement businesses, and many more.

  • You’ll need to fill out the Basic Business License forms found at business.dc.gov, and have your business and tax registration handy. Additionally, you’ll need to have the certificate of occupancy for your location OR if you work from home, you need to apply for a Home Occupancy Permit

    • Protip #3: These licenses will run ~$500 so be prepared for that upfront expense! 

  • There are other aspects to this process to consider based on the type of business you are opening, but these are high-level steps you will need to work through.

    • The Department of Small and Local Business Development (DSLBD) has enlisted our team at Cureate to create an online portal with features to help address your business’ needs.

      DSLBD is committed to helping local businesses operate and grow in the District of Columbia — whether it’s through marketing your business, creating connections with your peers, or obtaining financing to grow. 

      We would love your feedback to help us find ways to demystify regulatory processes and minimize challenges for DC businesses and entrepreneurs. If you have a moment, please take a brief survey we’ve put together to let us know what you need as a business and how DC Government can better serve you — http://bit.ly/ToolkitBiz
       

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This Entrepreneur Wins $1,000 from Community-Based Business

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 
 

EPISODE 14: THIS ENTREPRENEUR WINS $1,000 FROM COMMUNITY-BASED BUSINESS


A FEW QUOTES:

  • Do you have a challenge you've been facing at your business? We're starting minisodes on The Tidbit on the How-To's of growing and scaling your operations. Want to ask your questions to be answered on air? Sign-up for our newsletter! Links below.
  • Everyone is entitled to an exceptional living experience.
  • [Nest] creates a highly customer service oriented approach to property management.
  • When you have great spaces, you attract great tenants. And when you're happy at home, you are a better neighbor. And better neighbors are active in their communities, which is better for the city.
  • We measured our success based on the number of good jobs we were creating. 
  • Are you hiring a team member and putting them into a system that is streamlined?
  • The more streamlined we are from a systems-based perspective, our team can be there when there is an emergency or when there's an opportunity to problem solve. 
  • There was no way for me to enjoy success as an entrepreneur without having a really great team of talent. 
  • I wanted to create an opportunity for others to have the agency/ownership, [...] and buy into a new concept that was separate from but synergistic with Nest DC. 
  • We now have 15 owners of Roost DC! Hands-down this is one of my proudest moments as a business owner. 
  • Our ability to meaningfully to the community is core to our business from the beginning. Time and talent has always been available, but now we are financially giving back.
  • We're really excited to be offering $1,000 to... SOILFUL CITY!
  • Thanks for the work that you do - if there is anything we can do to help with exposure, we want to make sure you thrive and succeed! 
  • Hear Xavier's full reaction at 21:15 and how he intends to use the funds.
  • Listen to Xavier's full story on his Tidbit episode
     

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Taking Action with Food at Intersection of History, Art, and Culture

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

On this episode, I talk about lessons I'm learning around taking time to explore another side of my creative brain and how it relates to food.
 

EPISODE 13: TAKING ACTION WITH FOOD AT THE INTERSECTION OF HISTORY, ART, AND CULTURE

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A FEW QUOTES:

  • Food as a communication tool.
  • My mom made mandu growing up - and you can't make just one. It became a family ritual. Talking and making these potstickers. 
  • Tony's experience in AUBERGINE and his food memories, personally and with the cast runs until [15:56]. Tune in to learn more about the show and his history!
  • The Chinatown Collective's mission is to amplify the voices and experiences of Baltimore-based Asian American Pacific Islander artists, entrepreneurs, and creatives. 
  • Canton (neighborhood by the water) has a fascinating history [18:00]
  • A younger generation that has grown up in Baltimore, who understand the nuances of not being black or white in a black and white city.
  • The idea that we are a perpetual foreigner.
  • We joke that a lot of us second generation are #badasians
  • We call ourselves The Chinatown Collective because we span across many different Asian communities.
  • Who is Kitty Chin?! [23:44]
  • Three examples of AAPI community forging relationships [until 32:00]
  • Filipino food and soul food ... the similarities, even down to the meat cuts that are used. Typically, the meat cuts that were thrown away by the "higher class." 
     

RESOURCES

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We featured three entrepreneurs and their projects to be granted the funds raised through this podcast. By donating, YOU will get to vote on which project receives the funds.

That’s right — YOU have the power to put your dollars straight into the local economy by funding these projects. Join us! Donate via our Patreon page or by sending any amount to Cureate with a note as to which small business should receive the funds.  

Brewing the American Dream with Samuel Adams Master Brewer, Jennifer Glanville

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 12: BREWING THE AMERICAN DREAM


A FEW QUOTES:

  • “Across the country, in once-bustling manufacturing centers, breweries are giving new fizz to sleepy commercial districts. If alcohol-based businesses were blamed for a breakdown of society in the Prohibition era and beyond, breweries are now being seen as a force for good."
  • “The economic ripple effects are definitely there,” said David Barnett, a Chicago-based senior research analyst for JLL, a commercial brokerage firm. Breweries “create a cool tourism aspect for out-of-towners, but it’s been good for residents as well.”
  • "Although they are small, those breweries pack an economic jolt. In 2016, they contributed about $68 billion to the national economy, the Brewers Association said.”
  • “Throughout the 1970s, there were fewer than 100 breweries in the entire country, and the market was controlled by Coors, Budweiser, and Miller. But as Jim Koch, Founder of Sam Adams, went from bar to bar selling his small batch of beer, he discovered that there was a budding interest in craft brews.”
  • I created the Nano-Brewery 10 years ago ... and what this allows us to do is constantly experiment with different flavors, different brews ... try to stay ahead of the game. 
  • The craft drinker loves to try new beers, new ingredients - similarly in food.
  • I always want to know: what is your take on this [ingredient]? 
  • There's an old wives tale from the UK about using oysters in beer [...] I love the idea of having history be a part of our beer. 
  • "You've worked at Sam Adams for over 15 years now. What's employee retention and culture like at Sam Adams? A lot of entrepreneurs today have a really hard time hiring, and have an even harder time motivating employees to buy-into the quality and consistent output their business demands. What operational lessons have you learned as you've worked your way up through the company, and do you have any tips for the small business owner as they are beginning to build their teams?" [min 13:00]
  • It's all about the beer [...] it's a mindset. 
  • We want to make sure that you're not just a good fit for us, but we're a good fit for you.
  • Culture can mean many different things. That you want to go to work everyday, that you're passionate about what you do. At the end of the day, I really love grabbing a pint of beer with my coworkers. We even go on vacation together! 
  • Since 2008, Samuel Adams Brewing the American Dream has supported Accion in providing nearly 1,600 loans totaling $23.5 million to food and beverage businesses across the country that are creating or retaining approximately 5,900 jobs.
  • It's a tough pitch, it's only 2 minutes! Jennifer Glanville's Tips: (1) practice, practice, practice; (2) what is your story? tell me, why are you doing this?; (3) what are you going to do with the money? where do you see the brand going?
  • On developing your unique value proposition [~min 22:00]
  • Jennifer Glanville's tips for entrepreneurs: (1) get advice from outside of your family - get market feedback from your customers, find mentors; (2) it's very hard and scary to make the first step, but seek out resources and events like Sam Adams Brewing the American Dream Speed Coaching (plug: also School of Food!) 
     

RESOURCES

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We featured three entrepreneurs and their projects to be granted the funds raised through this podcast. By donating, YOU will get to vote on which project receives the funds.

That’s right — YOU have the power to put your dollars straight into the local economy by funding these projects. Join us! Donate via our Patreon page or by sending any amount to Cureate with a note as to which small business should receive the funds.  

On Self-Care and The Creative Process

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 11: ON SELF-CARE AND THE CREATIVE PROCESS


A FEW QUOTES:

  • “I just finished your latest podcast. It made me think  about purpose driven businesses and purpose driven people. I suspect one attracts the other. I often struggled with how to awaken the non purpose driven person to see the value in the greater good. Is it just in our DNA or is there a way in?” 
  • It is absolutely no wonder we are all trying to figure out ourselves, our purpose, how to figure out this blend of personal and professional life. Our systems are set up for us to be cogs in the wheel, productivity - efficiency, to not question the system, to not add your own individual creativity and purpose to the equation. But that is changing. And as we head to break, I want you to mull on this: the next time you’re feeling like a failure, or that you just can’t get it together, that you don’t know how to be both productive and creative, remember: you are not a failure - it’s really our societal norms that are failing you.
  • "The Creative Process - (1) This is Awesome; (2) This is Tricky; (3) This is Crap; (4) I am Crap; (5) This might be OK; (6) This is Awesome."
  • You'll never know what care you need, until you know yourself. 
  • Factor in the cost of self-care into your menu [recipe costing]. 
  • The high rate of imposter syndrome amongst people of color [...] there may not be a point of reference, or what that looks like, in order to achieve your dreams.
  • The journey of entrepreneurship showed me a lot of situations, as to who I should surround myself with, who I should hire, etc. If you're working 9-to-5, these are things you may not come across each day. [Entrepreneurship] gives you a strong sense of community, of the world view. 
  • [Are they killing it? Or] are they just not paying their employees well?
  • [If I am feeling stunted in my growth, I probably need to be repotted in a bigger pot]
  • "How might we..." 
  • BLK MARKET started as a cooperative economics model. [...] Allows our makers to get in front of an audience they normally wouldn't have. 
  • As creatives, we create something that we've become beholden to. 
  • They are all a part of me, but they are not me.
  • I am more than my creations.
  • Pivoting for passion preservation... I also call it self propagation.
     

RESOURCES

STAY IN THE KNOW


GET INVOLVED

We featured three entrepreneurs and their projects to be granted the funds raised through this podcast. By donating, YOU will get to vote on which project receives the funds.

That’s right — YOU have the power to put your dollars straight into the local economy by funding these projects. Join us! Donate via our Patreon page or by sending any amount to Cureate with a note as to which small business should receive the funds.  

March Madness 2018: ACCESS TO OPPORTUNITY

At Cureate, our mission is to provide access to knowledge and new business opportunity so that small business can survive and thrive. March 2018 is chalk-full of new business opportunities that we want to share with you! Here it goes:


Sam Adams Brewing the American Dream: Pitch Competition

  • $10K AND A YEAR OF COACHING FROM SAM ADAMS EMPLOYEES! Apply here: http://btad.samueladams.com/how-we-help/pitch-room-competition
  • Brewing ideas is easy for some of us. Selling them is hard. That’s why we’ve created The Brewing the American Dream Pitch Room. The Pitch Room is a competition that teaches rising food and beverage craftspeople how to perfect the art of the sales pitch. If you are a Baltimore food, beverage, or craft brewing business owner with a packaged product or a liquid that is currently on draft or bottled, apply now for the chance to compete in our Baltimore Pitch Room Competition, taking place on March 27th, for a chance to win $10K and a year of coaching from the employees of Samuel Adams!
  • Deadline is March 21st 11:59PM EST. 

 

Sam Adams Brewing the American Dream: Speed Coaching

 

The Good Food Movement

 

AccelerateHER

  • More information: https://www.glensgardenmarket.com/acclerateherdc
  • An awesome program live now for female founders to apply to - check out application above! What does the winner receive? At stake: a $10,000 no-strings investment; a year-long professional mentorship with Glen’s Founder (Danielle Vogel), our Marketing Director Shana Muhammad, and Grocery Department Head Merrill Dagg; and monthly Human Resources and strategic planning with Melissa Jones, Philanthropic Consultant and Food Systems Advocate. In addition, the winner will receive a complimentary entry to the Good Food Mercantile in Brooklyn this July, an amazing opportunity to meet the very best independent specialty retailers in the country.

 

WOW Festival Baltimore

  • More information here: http://wow-baltimore.org/
  • We would like 12 women owned food & beverage makers to be featured. They can sample products if they'd like, in addition to selling their product on site to attendees. 
  • The hours: 9 am - 4 pm on Saturday, April 28.
  • Get in touch with Intrinsic Events if you're interested (and tell them Cureate sent you!)

 

POW! WOW! DC

  • POW! WOW! DC is looking to feature a group of DMV producers at their VIP bodega for artists that are traveling into DC from around the globe. Interested in being a part of their pop-up bodega? Get in touch.
  • More info: For ten days in May, a curated group of artists from around the globe will travel to Washington, DC to paint larger-than-life murals at our annual celebration of art and creativity, the international mural festival called POW! WOW! DC. The name POW! WOW! was inspired from the color filled pages of comic books. “POW!” being the impact that art has on a person; a punch in the face, something that surprised you. “WOW!” being the reaction that art has on a viewer. Together they form “POW! WOW!, - a term which describes a gathering that celebrates culture, music and art. This event represents the core mission of POW! WOW!, to beautify, educate and bring people together through the power of art.
  • Media Partners: HYPEBEAST • SUPERSONIC ART ACCLAIM MAGAZINE • HIGHSNOBIETY ARRESTED MOTION • HI FRUCTOSE MONSTER CHILDREN • INSTAGRAFITE COMPLEX • THE HUFFINGTON POST JUXTAPOZ • STREET ART NEWS • LA TACO • FLUORO • BOOOOOOOM • LIVING FAST MAGAZINE • COOL HUNTING VNA MAGAZINE • BLISSS GRAFFUTURISM

As always, for more access to knowledge and new business opportunity, listen to our radio show The Tidbit (link to iTunes) or subscribe to The Tidbit newsletter (link in footer).

How to Craft Your Investor Pitch as a Purpose-Driven Business

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

Do you run a small business, or have dreams to start one? Each week on The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, we discuss tidbits of knowledge around starting and running a small business with a food and beverage lens. Show host Kim Bryden sits down with guest experts and shares trending new topics on food, business and culture to help best prepare you for your business journey. 

EPISODE 10: HOW TO CRAFT YOUR INVESTOR PITCH AS A PURPOSE-DRIVEN BUSINESS


A FEW QUOTES:

  • We need an abundance of creators, from different walks of life, creating new solutions. It’s not a zero sum game. If one person wins, that does not mean everyone else loses. Creation is expansive. Creation creates more innovations and more exciting challenges to be solved!
  • I am reading this New York Times piece titled, “The Tyranny of Convenience” that I find utterly fascinating. I bring this up because, to me, it seems that our technologies of the past 5-8 years have solely been built to around optimizing convenience. Tasks your parents would do for you if you still lived at home - get my groceries, clean my laundry, drive me to school. And I am asking the question, is that really a problem that needs to solved for? Are we gaining more leisure time and bettering our lives by having more convenience?
  • "Convenience is all destination and no journey. But climbing a mountain is different from taking the tram to the top, even if you end up at the same place. We are becoming people who care mainly or only about outcomes. We are at risk of making most of our life experiences a series of trolley rides.”
  • I want you to ask yourself: Who is building my future? Who are we empowering to build our solutions? Who is deciding what I believe and how I live out my life?
  • Your WHY is what gets you up in the morning, keeps you going through the hard times. Good ideas are a dime a dozen, execution is hard. 
  • Purpose is the new bottom line.
  • The winners of the future are not focusing myopically on shareholders, they will be the companies that engage us all.
  • 47% of people are able to get food, drink to the table; 51% is how you make people feel. 
  • Competition in terms of product and service - it's fierce. The thing that sets you a part is what you believe.
  • Greyston Bakery is pioneering open hiring. I believe everyone is employable.
  • Culture is a tangible asset — you can measure it, you can build it. 
  • There were a group of customers coming to us and asking: how do I lower costs and raise revenue? And then, there was another group of customers asking: how do I get employees to give a damn? how do I have my suppliers view us as partners? These companies asking the latter questions ended up fairing better. 
  • Tip #1 on the pitch: RELAX. We get nervous, so take a step back and know that you know your business better than anyone else.
  • Tip #2: Start with your WHY. Begin with your presentation with WHY it matters to you, and WHY it should matter to anyone else. 
  • Tip #3: When someone is giving a pitch, there is only one thing I know for sure — their numbers are wrong. The numbers are a projection. What is your rationale? I want to know your thinking behind why you believe those numbers.
  • There are a lot of businesses out there that are solutions looking for a problem.
  • Tip #4: What people often skip over is the HOW. How am I going to get 4% of all grocery stores in Washington, DC? How am I going to get to 1% of everyone in China? 
  • Big fan of the micro-test!
  • Urban Resilience: "the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, and systems within a city to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what kinds of chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience"
  • Your journey and the problems you have are unique to you - and you're able to build to solutions with that worldview. 
     

RESOURCES

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GET INVOLVED

We featured three entrepreneurs and their projects to be granted the funds raised through this podcast. By donating, YOU will get to vote on which project receives the funds.

That’s right — YOU have the power to put your dollars straight into the local economy by funding these projects. Join us! Donate via our Patreon page or by sending any amount to Cureate with a note as to which small business should receive the funds.  

Preserving Our Local Food & Watershed Ecosystem

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, digests this region’s small business landscape through food and beverage entrepreneurship. Tune in for trending new Tidbits at the top of the show, and then live interviews with business owners throughout the DC & Baltimore Metro Areas. Each week show host Kim Bryden will intertwine socio-cultural context, personal narrative, and business advice at The Tidbit. 

EPISODE 09: PRESERVING OUR LOCAL FOOD & WATERSHED ECOSYSTEM


A FEW QUOTES:

  • A lot of the Anacostia looks like it did 400 years ago.
  • One of the main trading areas of the Mid-Atlantic area was at the confluence of the Anacostia and Potomac rivers.
  • There were so many things to eat in and along the Anacostia - fish, wild rice, squash.
  • Wild rice was locally extinct until two decades ago, and we found seed in the soil [...] preventing geese from overeating. We've regrown the population of wild rice. 
  • 2,500 acres of wild plants used to dominate the Anacostia.
  • An estimated 17,000 people per year are eating fish from the Anacostia river.
  • "The Anacostia River has long divided the District of Columbia. In 1791, Pierre L’Enfant designed the “City of Washington” on only the west side of the Anacostia, launching the two sides of the river on very different trajectories. More than two centuries later, the communities on the east side of the Anacostia continue to lag in many educational and economic measures."
  • Embassies were slated to be placed on the East side of the Anacostia river but they wanted too much money for the land, so they moved over here. But the best views are on that side of the river.
  • People who have lived at River Terrace who have lived there for 60 years, and have never been on a boat. The access is the thing that is missing. How can we create the lines of access?
  • The District Department of Energy and Environment have found species on the endangered species list in Maryland.
  • We need to develop community resiliency around knowing what our land is providing for us (in regards to seasonal eating). 
  • The way we live is not sustainable right now.
  • That migratory fish that shows up in March, Native Americans saw it almost like a god. 
  • The Anacostia Watershed, 80% of the water is in DC. PG county and Montgomery county drain into the District. All of the things that happen in that area, impact that watershed. 
  • We're getting 43" of rain per year, why are we flushing drinking water down the toilet?
  • There are a lot of new jobs being created because of green infrastructure.
  • We may pay $80 to get a massage, but you can achieve that same goal by walking through the island. 
  • What is a vernal pool?
  • Kingman Island has served different purposes over time: farming during Great Depression, a landfill for construction debris, etc. Fast-forward to 1996 it was Federal property but transitioned to District property. 
  • Visit your local parks! Be a tourist in your own backyard. 
  • This year, there will be less sewage in the Anacostia than in the Potomac. 
     

SHOUT OUTS & RESOURCES:

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GET INVOLVED

We featured three entrepreneurs and their projects to be granted the funds raised through this podcast. By donating, YOU will get to vote on which project receives the funds.

That’s right — YOU have the power to put your dollars straight into the local economy by funding these projects. Join us! Donate via our Patreon page or by sending any amount to Cureate with a note as to which small business should receive the funds.  

What's Old is New, The New New and Branded Marketplaces: 3 Food Trends Shaping Portugal

What I find fascinating about Old World countries is the transformation of their local economies in the wake of globalism. How do you hold true to your roots in your own country, while your country's brand is being exported and new culture is migrating in? It's a difficult balance. 

After spending a long weekend in Portugal (Lisbon, Porto), I began realizing how certain global trends are shaping up in this Old World country and how the younger (read: Millennial) generation is adapting to these shifting times. 

1. What's Old is New

Photo Feb 24, 7 28 00 AM.jpg

I was reading this article the other day about traditional marketing tactics (billboards, radio ads, etc) are making a comeback as "new" marketing tactics are becoming saturated (content creation, digital media, etc). Is this happening across business verticals? In relation to the food industry, I've recognized the desire for a comeback of classics — but with a new twist. 

Take the kiosk pictured. In Portugal, kiosks (quiosques) have become a central place for individuals to grab a delicious beverage with friends, and a friendly place to drink solo. These aren't just typical beverages either. Sure you could grab a glass of wine or a beer, but also grab a port & tonic or a sour cherry liquor shot. What are ways we could reimagine spaces that we have a preconceived notion about, and turn them into something new? I've been thinking about this a lot in regards to corner stores. What are other spaces that could use a new product mix, an interior refresh to their classic exteriors?

2. The New New

I know, I know I just commented on the resurgence of classics. However, call me a Millennial, but I am loving the imagination of the new wave of "younger" business owner/operators. This generation cares about (speaking personally and as an observation): paying homage to ones roots while adding ones own unique spin, getting creative with ambiance/the entire hospitality experience, and storytelling through fine details. 

Each of these locations we frequented had its own special vibe, while all adhering to these core elements listed above. We felt instantly at home, with familial feelings in both decor and dish, while also a sparked creativity and allure to discover something new. 

3. Branded Marketplaces

Photo Feb 27, 1 00 18 PM.jpg

We're used to private-sector businesses naming locations like Sports Arenas, but how do we feel about the branding of locations that are supposed to inspire connection, intimacy? Licensing of ones brand means you have you create a framework of how you will continue to live out your brand values, even if you are not the operator. This is really interesting to me as big brands (or here: a media company) are looking to diversify revenue streams. 

This is an interesting quote from a recent Eater piece on the Hello Kitty brand: "Collaborations like these are dreamed up by Sanrio’s licensing department, which was established in 1999 in order to diversify and expand its business. A licensing agreement allows a partner company to use a brand’s intellectual property (logos, slogans, and in Sanrio’s case, characters) on its products. One of Sanrio’s first major partnerships was food-adjacent: that same year, a set of small plush dolls celebrating Hello Kitty’s romance with fellow Sanrio character Dear Daniel were made available in McDonald’s Happy Meals." 

Food halls have been pretty pervasive globally, but this is the first time I've seen a branded "Time Out Market" in Lisbon, and soon to open in Miami. What do you think, good idea or pushing the brand limit?

Soilful City: we view farming not only as a way to cultivate food and sovereignty for communities, but as a way to heal and rebuild our souls

LIVE at The Line Hotel in Adams Morgan in partnership with Full Service Radio... 

The Tidbit, brought to you by Cureate, digests this region’s small business landscape through food and beverage entrepreneurship. Tune in for trending new Tidbits at the top of the show, and then live interviews with business owners throughout the DC & Baltimore Metro Areas. Each week show host Kim Bryden will intertwine socio-cultural context, personal narrative, and business advice at The Tidbit. 

EPISODE 08: SOILFUL CITY — An organization that views farming not only as a way to cultivate food and sovereignty for communities, but as a way to heal and rebuild our souls


A FEW QUOTES:

  • The Racist Housing Policy that Made Your Neighborhood: "One of the most heinous policies was introduced by the creation of the Federal Housing Administration in 1934, and lasted until 1968. Otherwise celebrated for making homeownership accessible to white people by guaranteeing their loans, the FHA explicitly refused to back loans to black people or even other people who lived near black people." 
  • When we look at the creation of this country, it started with the murdering, pillaging of people and taking their land.
  • Land has always been at the foundation of the American empire.
  • There have been barriers since the 1840s for African Americans to build wealth.
  • This land isn't my land, it belongs to its indigenous peoples. 
  • Soilful City uses the principles of Kwanzaa as a guiding philosophy for creating and sustaining healthy neighborhoods. Intertwining these tenets with the wisdom of Mother Nature allows us to use agriculture as way to heal and organize stressed communities. 
  • Healing is important. We're not really taught how to heal. 
  • "How can you let the pain transcend you higher"
  • If you want to have a heart-to-heart conversation, what better place than with the land, birds, sky... 
  • "Connecting History through Flavors" - Pippin Sauce!
  • It's a communal process to produce this hot sauce.
  • You definitely want to hear the story of Horace Pippin (starting at 20:35)
  • I want to tell the story of the community who grew the peppers in your bottle of hot sauce.
  • Project Goal: To use funds towards purchasing of bottles, new labels for brand new product launch — incorporating practices in urban agriculture, community resiliency  (donate! patreon.com/thetidbit).
     

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This is the third episode featuring three entrepreneurs and their projects to be granted the funds raised through this podcast. By donating, YOU will get to vote on which project receives the funds.

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